Sports
by Andy Moore on August 19, 2012

Now, the New York Daily News has learned that Cabrera knew back in July he was going to have to explain to the MLB why his testosterone levels had spiked. So, he and his agents hired a “consultant” named Juan Nunez to buy and develop a fake website that would sell non-existent products, including a fake supplement Cabrera told the MLB he bought without knowing it would increase his testosterone. 

Yes, Cabrera attempted to lie to the MLB by making up a website with a supplement that didn't exist. He did this to the MLB, which has aggressively pursued steroids-users in recent years, many times with the assistance of the FDA and other federal authorities. When Cabrera and associates showed the website as evidence during an appeal, the league saw through the ruse in about, oh, 30 seconds.

The website was part of the presentation Cabrera and his representatives made to MLB and the players’ union before the league officially charged him with a doping violation.

Cabrera was at that point hoping to repeat the success Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun found earlier this year in challenging the evidence in arbitration. Braun escaped a 50-game ban for elevated levels of testosterone by raising doubts about the collection and storage of the sample, setting a hopeful example for other players who test positive.

MLB’s department of investigations quickly began asking questions about the website and the “product” — Where was the site operating from? Who owned it? What kind of product was it? — and quickly discovered that an existing website had been altered, adding an ad for the product, a topical cream, that didn’t exist.

 

Now, while Cabrera sits out with a suspension, his and his agents' partner in crime, Nunez, may take the fall with the feds, who prosecute illegal websites selling non-existent pharmaceutical products.

Got to love our National Pastime. 

Via NYDN