Music
by Brandon Wenerd on March 5, 2013

Late last night a bunch of EDM influences started freaking out on Twitter about an alleged Daft Punk leak off the robots' new album with Columbia Records. The timing for a leak to hype the album would make sense: Daft Punk just psyched everyone out this past Saturday night with a series of bizarre 15-second SNL commercials. The alleged leak was called “No End” and popped up under an account called Artinsitute2011 on February 13 with a bright “Daft Punk” logo as the video's static image. Almost immediately, duplicates started popping up like dandelions on YouTube, mistitled as a Daft Punk leak. I.E.:

 

It's a pretty chill track, ah? Many savvy Daft Punk fans were quick to call a spade a spade, noting it didn't sound like it was anywhere close to Daft Punk's production standards. Most ignored feeding the trolls. Some, however, were duped feeling the track passed the Daft Punk Duck Test. Sorry, believers: Turns out it's not Daft Punk-produced track at all, just an unknown, trolling EDM production entity called “Art Institute” looking for a quick fix of viral publicity. Turns out the track is an original production called “Metal film resistor.”

The pranksters updated the track with this message:

Hello everyone we are the art-Institue want to reveal the mystery that has haunted these days there (even if someone has solved itself :) ……….. you have heard these are not daft punk but four of our productions, because they are under menitite remains is very simple who would listen if the title of the video was: Art Institute Metal-film resistor # 2

virtually no one (as evidenced by the rest of our tracks)

there is no profit in what we do, it is true of our other tracks were on sale in sotre for a period of time, the service sruttando Zimabal ….. but in the end there was no gain and we have also put money to withdraw, however these are not sold in any store, for us it was a great pleasure that someone has faith, even if only for a moment that everything was real and for this we offer you our apologies, renaming the video with the correct name, so that no more fall into the trap.

So there you go, Internet. You've been trolled. Now it makes sense why one of Art Institute's recent YouTube uploads was “Trick Master”:

 

Some people in the YouTube comments are pissed — as people are wont to do — about being misled by the group. Others are applauding the production work on a laidback catchy jam. Welcome to a hyped digital release in the digital age.

Meanwhile, IndieShuffle has another alleged leak that's obviously another lame fake trolling stunt. Daft Punk fans, we'll just have to wait this one out… Still, an album and tour are most definitely on the way.

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