Music
by Andy Moore on June 5, 2013

A couple of years ago, a 53-year-old communications advisor from South Florida began noticing that certain musicians were better at building their brands on Twitter than the so-called “social media experts” she followed. The lady, known online as @WebDiva423, wrote a blog post explaining the phenomenon, and she singled out Waka Flocka Flame in particular for “getting social media right.” Waka RT'd her and began following her online.

What followed was a strange and amazing journey of self-discovery for the communications advisor. She began listening to other Brick Squad artists and actually reviewing their mixtapes and singles. This wasn't a middle-aged Caucasion woman who, maybe, began enjoying Kanye because she liked his socially conscious lyrics and 1960s soul samples. She started reviewing TRAP shit, and even interviewing artists associated with Waka Flocka and the Bay Area Based movement. Her blog began to fill up. She showed more knowledge than even the most devoted hip-hop head. And this was her (hilarious) archives page.

Anyway, WebDiva decided a year ago that it was time for her to see her hero, Waka Flocka, in person. Her husband didn't want to go. He husband really didn't want her to go, telling her that he didn't like the idea of so “many black men putting their bodies in close proximity to [her].” WebDiva went anyway and even sprung for backstage passes. Here's what happened:

Of course, my ex probably didn’t really think Waka would ‘co-mingle’ with me, but it was the fact that he even suggested this kind of bullshit scenario that made my mind up for me. I got my Waka concert ticket. I went by myself. And guess what? There were more white people there than anything else, and people from every age group. It was amazing. And the Brick Squad Monopoly gang (including Wooh Da Kid, Kayo Redd, Haitian Fresh, Sugar Shane, and more) burned up the stage.

Then Waka came out. The crowd went absolutely insane, and Waka did too. Waka onstage had enormous charisma and magnetism, and you couldn’t keep your eyes off him. He had the same kind of Jim Morrison combination of sex, danger & unpredictability. Aside from a group of little white boys in their sisters’ jeans who told me “Hey, this isn’t Woodstock” and the jackasses who kept blowing smoke at me, no one cared how old anyone was or what they looked like.

I paid extra for my BSM T-shirt and a meet & greet with Waka after the concert. This meant you got to get your photo taken with Waka. I had DM’d him a few times before the concert to tell him I was coming & would be the old white lady with reddish hair in the front. When I got my turn for the photo, I said, “Waka, you follow me on Twitter.” He replied, “Oh yeah, you said you was comin’!”

 

Waka and the 53-year-old then proceeded to spend five minutes hanging out with each other. Positive stories of Waka Flocka interactions are legion, by the way—he's reportedly a surprisingly nice guy when meeting fans—but this is a whole different level of cool and strange.

The encounter caused WebDiva to reconsider her marriage, which had been on the rocks for a while. She didn't like how her husband stopped supporting her during her, uh, trap phase. And they're now happily divorced. Unreal.

Here's how the post ends:

The moral of this story? Don’t EVER let anyone else keep you from your bliss, no matter what that may be. If someone truly loves you, they will come along for the adventure. Otherwise, get the heck out and live your life to the fullest. Believe me, you’ll sleep better at night and have a song in your heart.

The song in MY heart will always be a song by Waka Flocka Flame.

 

Like I said, on the surface, this story is bizarre—a tale of a middle-aged woman having what some what would call a Freaky Friday-esque breakdown. But there's also a great lesson in non-conformity here. WebDiva wasn't doomed to a life of Eagles albums. So she got out. Brick fucking squad.