Life
by Lance Pauker on July 24, 2013

Quite a great “Onion in Real Life” article from the Wall Street Journal, which notes that human contact and validation will increase the happiness of people who don't necessarily have those things.

Extroverts, those outgoing, gregarious types who wear their personalities on their sleeve, are generally happier, studies show. Some research also has found that introverts, who are more withdrawn in nature, will feel a greater sense of happiness if they act extroverted.

Experts aren't entirely sure why behaving like an extrovert makes people feel better. One theory is that being talkative and engaging influences how people respond to you, especially if that response is positive. Others speculate that people get more satisfaction when they express their core self and opinions. Another possibility: Happiness might come simply from having successfully completed a goal, such as giving a speech.

 

Another theory is that having a decent self-esteem is helpful if you're trying not to hate yourself. 

So why don't introverts act like extroverts more often? John Zelenski, a psychologist at Carleton University in Ottawa, and fellow researchers probed that question in an April article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

A series of studies, which included more than 600 college students, found that introverts misjudge how they would feel after acting extroverted. They often predicted feelings of anxiety and embarrassment, which never transpired.

“Introverts kind of underestimate how much fun it will be to act extroverted,” said Dr. Zelenski. “You don't think you want to go to a party and then go and have a great time.” Dr. Zelenski and other researchers also considered whether people acting in a way that goes against their natural disposition might wear themselves out…

“We didn't find a lot of evidence for…the idea that acting like an extrovert would wear out introverts,” said Dr. Zelenski. However, he said: “We found acting like an introvert tended to wear out extroverts,” who performed worse on cognitive tests.

 

The takeaway–lame people could easily be cool if they sacked up and did cool people things. Cool people find being lame exhausting. You are now free reflect on that minimal amount of time you'll never get back. 

[H/T: WSJ]